Department

Orthopedic

Orthopedic and Joint Replacement Department of Aartham Multi Super Speciality Hospital in Ahmedabad offers wide range of surgical treatments for diseases and injuries related to skeleton and attached parts such as ligament, Knee, Shoulder, Spine, Hip, etc.

Orthopedic and joint replacement department of Aartham Hospital is equipped with latest technology to carryout minimally invasive surgical techniques so recovery time of a patient can be reduced to a great extent. Arthroscopy for joint problems, sports injury, prolapse disc backache, spondylolysis & Spondylolisthesis surgery, fracture, accident injury, machine injury, treatment with key hole surgery by IITV, non-union osteomyelitis treatment by Ilizarov Method, joint pain, polio, congenital deformities surgery are successfully done at Aartham Hospital.

Emergency cases related to road traffic accident, police and medicolegal cases are also treated at Aartham Hospital in Ahmedabad. Multiple Operation Theatres are in ready to handle any such eventualities and emergencies.

The best orthopedic surgeon in Ahmedabad and the best spine surgeon in Ahmedabad are part of core team of Aartham Multi Super Speciality Hospital. Dr Saurabh N Shah, One of the top 10 Orthopedic Doctors In Ahmedabad, Gujarat, is leading the department and he is accredited with more than 10,000+ successful surgeries.


Joint Replacement Treatment at Aartham Hospital

Joint replacement surgery is carried out to remove damaged or diseased parts of a joint and replace them with new, man-made parts.

Joint replacement can reduce pain and help you move and feel better. These days’ due to advancement of technology hips and knees are replaced easily and with minimal loss of blood or damage to tissues. Other joints that can be replaced include the shoulders, fingers, ankles, and elbows.

Knee / Joint Replacement at Aartham Hospital in Ahmedabad

Aartham Multi Super Speciality Hospital is having most modern infrastructure for Knee Replacement Joint Replacement in Ahmedabad. Knee replacement surgery is often a last resort treatment for an injured or damaged knee joint. This procedure takes a few hours, but recovery and rehabilitation can last months. Some of the risks of this procedure are infection, nerve damage, and knee stiffness.

Knee joint replacement is a procedure that involves replacing an injured or ailing knee with an artificial joint, or prosthesis. Another name for this procedure is knee arthroplasty. Knee replacements are a very common surgery.

The prosthesis is made of metal alloys, plastics, and polymers. It mimics the function of a knee. Replacement knees can fit your needs and specifications. When selecting a prosthetic knee, doctors at Aartham Multi Super Speciality Hospital will take into account your Age, Weight, Activity level and overall health

The procedure to remove your old knee and replace it with prosthesis usually takes less than two hours, but recovery and rehabilitation can last months.

Hip Replacement Surgery in Ahmedabad

Hip replacement surgery at Aartham Hospital will relieve pain in the hip joint, help your hip joint work well and restore normal walking and other movements. Hip replacement surgery has a very high success rate, and offers an incredible quality of life improvement for most patients. If you have hip damage and pain in which physical therapy, medicines and exercise are not helping, then hip replacement may be the solution for a better quality of life.

Hip replacement surgery at Aartham Hospital in Ahmedabad involves replacing components of the ball and socket hip joint with a synthetic implant, thereby repairing the damaged bearing surfaces that are causing pain. In a total hip replacement both the thigh bone (femur) and the socket are replaced with synthetic implants. The type of materials chosen for the hip replacement depends on the age of the patient, type of arthritis and quality of bone.

Spine Treatment at Aartham Hospital, Ahmedabad

Aartham Multi Super Speciality Hospital in Ahmedabad, Gujarat is a complete one stop solution for all your spine related problems. The spinal cord injury rehabilitation centre has world class best spine doctors/therapists who are diligent and keen to provide you best of the treatments.

At Aartham Hospital, we cater a large variety of spine care treatments without surgery including curved spine treatment, DISH spine treatment, cervical spine treatment and spine arthritis treatment.

Symptoms of Spinal Stenosis

Spinal stenosis refers to the narrowing of spaces in the spine that can cause pressure on the spinal cord and nerves. About 75% cases of spinal stenosis occur in the lower back and in majority of the cases; the narrowing of the spine associated with stenosis compresses the nerve root, resulting in pain along the back of the leg. Spine stenosis treatment is a long term solution for this problem. There are many potential causes for spinal stenosis together with factors like aging, arthritis, heredity, tumours or trauma. Spinal stenosis may result in low back pain as well as pain in the legs. Stenosis may pinch the nerves that control muscle power and sensation in the legs. Additional symptoms may include frequent falling, difficulty while walking, numbness etc.

Spine Regions

The spine (also called the vertebral column or spinal column) is composed of a series of bones called vertebrae stacked one upon another. There are four regions of the spine are Cervical (neck),Thoracic (chest/trunk), Lumbar (low back) and Sacral (pelvic)

Trauma Surgery Treatment at Aartham Hospital

At Aartham Multi Super Speciality Hosptial, we have managed fractures of various joints due to accidents or osteoporosis.

The process of re-joining and realigning the edges of the broken bones is called as fracture repair. Fracture repair is always done by a surgeon, orthopaedist or doctor. In few emergency cases, first aid is given for temporary realignment. Further, a proper medical supervision is needed.

We generally do all kinds of Plating, Nailing or putting various implants to manage complicate & complete fractures.

Spinal Block Treatment at Aartham Hospital in Ahmedabad

A spinal block is sometimes called a “spinal.” In this procedure, a narcotic or anaesthetic such as fetanyl, bupivacaine or lidocaine is injected below the spinal column directly into the spinal fluid, which provides pain relief for as long as 2 hours.

It is easy to confuse a spinal block and spinal epidural because they are both injections into the spinal area. For a spinal block, narcotics or anaesthetic is injected once with a needle. For a spinal epidural or combined spinal epidural, a catheter is placed in the epidural space to allow continuous anaesthesia.

A spinal block may cause one or more of the following conditions:

  • Hypotension (low blood pressure)
  • Difficulty pushing during the second stage of labor
  • Severe headache requiring an epidural blood patch
  • Pruritus (itching)
  • In rare instances, convulsions
  • Both narcotics and “caine” medications cross the placenta and
  • enter the baby’s blood stream
  • Baby might have trouble breastfeeding after birth

Spine Surgery or Back Pain Surgery at Aartham Hospital, Ahmedabad

Back pain is one of the most common health problems prevalent among a large number of people around the world. Continuously sitting for long hours, lack of exercise and unhealthy working habits are some of the most common causes of back pain. Typically, back pain is treated with simple medications or exercises. It is only when all this fails and quality of life is severely affected than the doctors at Aartham Multi Super Speciality Hospital recommend spine surgery to treat severe and prolonged back pain condition.

Foraminotomy

This type of surgical procedure involves removing the tissues that compress the nerves in the back. During the surgery process, the Aartham Hospital surgeons remove parts of the bone that constricts the nerves in the spinal column. As stability of the spine is sometimes affected, a procedure called spinal fusion is also done.

Laminectomy

This is the most widely recommended type of spine surgery for spinal conditions caused by spondylolisthesis and stenosis. The surgery involves removing parts of the back bone, to relieve pressure on the spinal nerves. The surgery is usually performed in combination with spine fusion surgery when instability of spine is suspected.

Spinal disc replacement

Although this surgical procedure is not very common, it is applied as one of the new surgical treatments for back pain. An artificial disc is used to replace the damaged spinal disc, which is present between the vertebrae. This surgery permits continued spine mobility and can be done without spine fusion.

Spine Fusion

This surgery involves joining two vertebrae together to increase spine stability. This results in restricted movements and limits stretching of nerves.

Discectomy

It is a type of spine surgery that is used to treat the herniated disc in the vertebrae. A disc separates two vertebrae and if it herniates inwards it presses on the spinal nerves causing pain. In discectomy all or part of the disc is removed.


Knee Replacement FAQs General

This section will help you find answers for various frequently asked questions so you can make a well informed decision about Knee Replacement. Still you have any other questions we are always approachable.

  • When do I need surgery?
When do I need surgery?

The need for a knee replacement surgery is the need to improve one’s quality of life. When you have a gnawing pain and discomfort that affects your quality of life on a regular basis you need surgery. This is a personal decision depending on how active you currently are and how active you need to be. In India, we have plenty of people who modify their lifestyle to suit their pain, they walk less and sit at home because walking gives them pain, all this to avoid surgery. This is opposite to what people in the west do. People there undergo surgery so that they can play golf.

Knee replacement patients who are suffering from osteoarthritis are often elderly, above the age of 55, they may be having pain for many years and feel that it is getting worse and their ability to walk getting reduced. If you are diabetic and hypertensive surgery can bring in added benefits because once you become mobile and active these ailments come under control.

  • What is the ideal age?
What is the ideal age?

There is no ideal age. Since this surgery is done for age-related knee pain it is usually done in the elderly. If you are younger and in terrible pain and all other options save for painkillers do not work then you are a candidate. Diabetes and blood pressure are not contraindications to a knee replacement. Well controlled heart patients can undertake the surgery as it is usually done in regional (local) anaesthesia and not under general anaesthesia.

  • What is the life of a knee replacement?
What is the life of a knee replacement?

It will usually last you for 20-25 years. That is why if done after 55 it should last a lifetime because as you grow older the demand on the knee also reduces.

  • How long does recovery take and how long will the pain last me?
How long does recovery take and how long will the pain last me?

Usually, the pain is maximum in the first 2 days however with newer techniques such as quadriceps-sparing or subvastus knee replacements (where the muscle is not cut) along with intraarticular injections and root blocks the pain control is much better. You will be made to walk the same or next day after surgery depending on your pain. There are only does after the surgery and no don’ts.

Pain medication is needed in the first few weeks post surgery so that you can exercise well and recover fast. The more you exercise the faster you recover. The exercises post surgery are simple but need to be done the more movement you try and achieve the better it will be for you. You may need the assistance of a physiotherapist post surgery.

Do not compare yourself with your neighbour friend, we assure you that you will walk, sooner than later! People are different and behave differently post surgery. Knee strength recovery postoperative depends on the knee strength pre-operation, so the more exercise you do prior to surgery always helps in the recovery postoperatively

  • Can I sit on the floor and do namaz and vajrasan?
Can I sit on the floor and do namaz and vajrasan?

If you have a good range of movement pre-surgery you will get a good range of movement post surgery. Knee range of movement depends on your movement before, besides this, the design of the implant and exercise plays a major factor. Sitting on the bed cross-legged is allowed. Sitting cross-legged on the floor and in namaz position causes faster wear and tear and shortens the life of the knee and is avoidable. Use your joint wisely and it will last you a long time

  • What are the new developments in the field of total knee arthroplasty
What are the new developments in the field of total knee arthroplasty

Implants-side specific and more sizing options: There are newer implants that are available in more sizing options and in more insert options. These come at an additional cost but ensure a better fit and better-optimized range of movement. These are also more expensive, so speak with your doctor about it.

Computer-guided knee replacement: Available since 2006, so technically it is not new. This technique ensures better alignment and more accurate cuts during the procedure. Not a compulsion today except in certain cases. In fact, internationally there has been a decline in the use of this technology.

CT and MRI guided patient cutting blocks: Hereafter doing a ct scan or MRI of the affected knee, special cutting blocks are made by the company that helps the surgeon do the knee replacement. The implants used are the standard ones. There is an additional cost of about 40000 in addition to the MRI costs for use of this technology. This too is nowadays less in use.

  • What is done in a knee replacement?
What is done in a knee replacement?

Well, the accurate term should be knee resurfacing. In knee replacement we just resurface the worn out part of the knee (the damaged cartilage and extra bone that forms) and replace it with metal on either side and a plastic (polyethene) is placed in between.

It is like your dentist putting a cap on your broken tooth. These prostheses are cemented in position with bone cement. Your muscles and ligaments are all preserved.

  • Care after knee replacement
Care after knee replacement

Prevent infection in the body or if you get it treat it early especially hidden infections like a dental and urinary tract. Visit your dentist every 6 months.

  • How soon can i return to work?
How soon can i return to work?

Usually, if you are in an office job you can return after stitch removal which is 2 weeks after surgery. If you are in a job that involves travel then you may take longer. There is no definitive time as it depends on your recovery and comfort level.

  • Complications in knee replacement
Complications in knee replacement

As in any other surgery, the knee replacement surgery also has potential complications, the most dreaded one being an infection. Hence we make sure that we operate in bigger institutes and not in smaller nursing homes. Blood clots in the leg are also common and measures like stockings and blood thinners may be started on patients in the postoperative period.


Knee Replacement FAQs Preoperative 

Here are some of the question which may arise before taking a decision of surgery. It’s good to go through these questions so if you have any misconception of wrong information that can be resolved with correct information.

  • What is the chance for success?
What is the chance for success?

In our practice, we define success by the ability to answer “yes” to the following three questions:

  • Are you glad you had the operation?
  • Did it fulfill your expectations?
  • Would you do it again?

Approximately 97% of patients at one year answered yes to all three questions.

  • What is the recovery time?
What is the recovery time?

Everyone heals from surgery at a different pace. It is difficult to compare yourself with others, as individual situations lead some patients to recover faster than others; however, in general, patients will use a walker or crutches while in the hospital.

These devices are typically for balance, and patients may weight-bear as their comfort allows. It is our experience that as patients comfort, confidence, and strength allows, they may progress to a cane.

Similarly, when patient’s comfort, confidence and strength allows, they progress off of the cane. Typically, patients may progress to a cane at 2-3 weeks. By 4-6 weeks’ time, many patients are not requiring any external supports. It may take up to 3 months to return to normal function and patients continue to improve, as far as their comfort, mobility, and function for up to a year after their surgery.

  • Will i go to a rehabilitation facility or home?
Will i go to a rehabilitation facility or home?

It depends. Many people are able to go home after their operation; however, you may go to a rehabilitation facility in order to gain the skills you need to safely return home.

Many factors will be considered in this decision. These factors include the availability of having friends or family to assist you at home, a safe home environment, postoperative functional status as determined by a physical therapist in the hospital, and overall evaluation by your hospital team.

  • When can I drive?
When can I drive?

This varies from patient to patient depending upon one’s comfort and confidence. Typically, patients may drive when they are using a cane comfortably and not taking narcotics. Do not drive if you are taking narcotics. Some surgeons do not allow the patient to drive until after they have been seen in the office at 4-6 weeks after surgery. Check with your surgeon.

  • When can I travel?
When can I travel?

You may travel as soon as you feel comfortable. It is recommended that you get up to stretch or walk at least once an hour when taking long trips. This is important to help prevent blood clots.

It is our recommendation that if you are embarking on a long trip within the first three months following the surgery that you take one 325mg Aspirin twice daily beginning 2 days prior to your trip and completing this regimen 2 days following your trip. You may want to contact your primary care physician should you have a history of stomach ulcers or allergies.

  • When can i return to work?
When can i return to work?

It depends on your profession. If a patient has a sedentary or desk job, they may return to work in approximately 3-6 weeks. If your work is more labor intensive, patients may require up to 3 months before they can return to full duty. In some cases, more or less time is necessary.

  • What activities are permitted following surgery?
What activities are permitted following surgery?

You may return to most activities as tolerated including: walking, gardening, golfing, and mild hiking. Some of the best activities to help with motion and strengthening are swimming and using a stationary bicycle.

Other activities typically enjoyed are fitness machines such as an elliptical machine or Nordic Track gliding machine. High impact activities such as running, jumping, and open field sporting activities as well as singles tennis, squash or racquetball should be avoided. Snow skiing is frequently enjoyed by patients who have a significant prior experience with skiing.

It should be noted, however, that downhill skiing does pose a risk. The risk comes not from the act of skiing itself, but rather from potential injury due to a serious fall or collision with another skier. Patients should avoid black diamond slopes and moguls. If you do wish to return to skiing, be aware of the risks and ski only under good conditions. It is ill-advised to take up skiing after surgery if you have had little experience with it previously.

  • How long will my knee surgery last?
How long will my knee surgery last?

This varies from patient to patient. For each year following your knee replacement, you have a 1% chance of requiring additional surgery. For example, at 10 years postoperatively, there is a 90% success rate without the need for further surgery

  • What medication should i stop prior to surgery?
What medication should i stop prior to surgery?

Ibuprofen and Aleve should be stopped 7 days prior to surgery. Aspirin (1 a day), Celebrex, do not need to be stopped prior to surgery.

  • Is there a role for “mis” (minimally invasive surgery/minimal incision surgery)?
Is there a role for “mis” (minimally invasive surgery/minimal incision surgery)?

It is true that today’s incisions for total knee replacement are typically shorter than in the past. We find patients are recovering faster than previously due to a variety of factors including patient motivation, physical therapy advances and improvements in preoperative pain control.

Further information regarding MIS surgery is best obtained from the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Position Statement on MIS surgery.

  • Is there a role for computer assisted surgery?
Is there a role for computer assisted surgery?

This is developing technology that perhaps may improve on an already very successful procedure. It may be especially useful in situations where patients have had prior surgery with retained hardware or unusual deformities. Your surgeon will discuss with you whether he believes there is a role for computer assisted surgery on an individual basis.

For an unbiased summary of computer assisted surgery we refer you to the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Position Statement on computer assisted surgery.


Knee Replacement FAQs Hospitalization 

Here are some of the question which may arise while patient is hospitalized so go through this section for better understanding of hospitalization care and processes.

  • When can I shower or get the incision wet?
When can I shower or get the incision wet?

If your dressing has been unstained for a 24-hour period and there is no drainage, then you can shower. You should avoid immersing your incision under water. When drying the incision, pat the incision dry, do not rub it.

  • When can I immerse my knee totally such as in a bathtub or swimming pool?
When can I immerse my knee totally such as in a bathtub or swimming pool?

Your knee can be totally immersed 4 weeks after surgery.

  • How often should I use the CPM (continuous passive motion) machine?
How often should I use the CPM (continuous passive motion) machine?

If you are given a CPM machine, you will probably start soon after surgery and use it 6-8 hours per day while hospitalized. The amount of bending will be gradually increased. Schedules vary widely from patient to patient. Very rarely do patients go home with a CPM machine. There is no consensus among surgeons as to the absolute need for CPM.

  • How long do I need a bandage on my incision?
How long do I need a bandage on my incision?

A bandage is applied for approximately one week and changed daily to a new dry sterile dressing. Sometimes its use is continued to prevent irritation from clothing.

  • When will my sutures or staples be removed?
When will my sutures or staples be removed?

Sutures are removed approximately 2 weeks after surgery. This may be done by a visiting nurse if you are at home, or by the rehabilitation staff if you are in are habilitation facility. Sometimes sutures dissolve on their own and do not have to be removed.


Knee Replacement FAQs After Discharge

Here are some of the question which may arise regarding the phase when patient is discharged from the hospital.This section addresses most of the query but if still there is a question we are approachable.

  • How long will I be on pain medication?
How long will I be on pain medication?

It is not unusual to require some form of pain medication for approximately 8- 12 weeks. Initially, the medication will be strong such as a narcotic. Most people are able to discontinue the strong pain medication after approximately 4-6 weeks and switch to an over-the-counter medication such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen.

  • How long will I be on a blood thinner?
How long will I be on a blood thinner?

Various options, including pills and injections are available to thin your blood and help prevent blood clots. Your surgeon will chose a therapy based on your medical history and possibly on tests done before you leave the hospital.

  • Can I drink alcohol during my recovery??
Can I drink alcohol during my recovery??

If you are taking Warfarin (Coumadin), a blood thinner, you should avoid alcohol intake because alcohol modifies the effect of this medication. You should also avoid alcohol if you are taking narcotics. Beyond this, you can use alcohol in moderation at your own discretion.

  • What are good and bad positions for my knee during recovery?
What are good and bad positions for my knee during recovery?

You should spend some time each day working on both flexing (bending) and extending (straightening) your knee. It is a good idea to change positions every 15-30 minutes. Avoid a pillow or roll under your knee. A roll under the ankle helps improve extension and prevent a contracture.

  • Should I apply ice or heat?
Should I apply ice or heat?

Initially, ice is most helpful to keep down swelling. After several weeks you may also try using heat and choose what works best for you.

  • How long should I wear compression stockings?
How long should I wear compression stockings?

Recommendations may vary from surgeon to surgeon. After you are home, you may try going without the stockings and see whether or not your ankles or feet tend to swell. If they do, wear the stockings during the day until the swelling returns to what was normal before surgery.

  • Can I go up and down stairs?
Can I go up and down stairs?

Yes. Initially, you will lead with your un-operated leg when going up stairs,and with your operated leg when coming down. As your muscles get stronger and yourmotion improves, you will be able to perform stairs in a more normal fashion, usually in about one month. A good rule of thumb to remember when deciding which leg to lead with is “up with the good, down with the bad.”

  • Will I need physical therapy.?
Will I need physical therapy.?

Yes. A physical therapist plays an important role in your recovery. You will be seen by a physical therapist soon after your operation and throughout your hospital stay. Once you are home, your therapist will probably visit with you 2 to 3 times a week to assist with your exercise program. You will also be taught a series of exercises that you can perform on your own without supervision. A written list will be provided by your physical therapist. In addition, swimming and using a stationary bike are good exercise options. These exercises can be continued indefinitely, even after your recovery is complete.


Knee Replacement FAQs Postoperative Concerns 

Patients can have many short term and long term postoperative concerns and we have done our best to address them in this section.

  • I feel depressed. Is this normal?
I feel depressed. Is this normal?

It is not uncommon to have feelings of depression after knee replacement surgery. This may be due to a variety of factors such as limited mobility, discomfort, increased dependency on others, and medication side effects. Feelings of depression will typically fade as you begin to return to regular activities. If your feelings of depression persist, consult your primary care physician.

  • I have insomnia. Is this normal, and what can I do about it?
I have insomnia. Is this normal, and what can I do about it?

Insomnia is a very common complaint following knee replacement surgery. Over-the-counter remedies such as Benadryl, melatonin, Tylenol pm or another over-the-counter sleep aid may be effective. If this continues to be a problem, prescription medication may be necessary.

  • I am constipated. What should I do?
I am constipated. What should I do?

Answer: Most people require 70 degrees of flexion to walk normally on level ground, 90 degrees to ascend stairs, 100 degrees to descend stairs, and 105 degrees to get out of a low chair. To walk and stand efficiently, your knee should come within 10 degrees of being fully straight.

  • How much range of motion do I need.?
How much range of motion do I need.?

It is very common to have constipation after surgery. This is due to a number of factors and is aggravated by the need to take narcotic pain medication. A simple over the-counter stool softeners (such as Colace) is the best prevention for this problem. In rare cases, you may require a suppository or enema.

  • What range of motion should I expect from my knee after 6 weeks and after one year?
What range of motion should I expect from my knee after 6 weeks and after one year?

Everyone’s range of motion varies and depends on many individual factors. Your potential will be determined at the time of your surgery. The average patient achieves approximately 115 degrees of flexion by one year after surgery. Some patients achieve less, and others much more.

  • I think my leg feels longer now. Is this possible?
I think my leg feels longer now. Is this possible?

In the majority of cases your leg length will essentially be unchanged. In some cases, however, the leg is lengthened. This is usually the result of straightening out a knee that preoperatively had a significant bow. At first the increased length may feel awkward. Most people become accustomed to the difference, but occasionally, a shoe lift may be necessary in the opposite extremity.

  • Can I use weights when I exercise?
Can I use weights when I exercise?

Generally, weights are not used for the first 2 months after surgery. As you progress with your physical therapy program, your physical therapist may recommend the use of weights.

  • Will I set off the security monitors at the airport? Do I need a doctor’s letter?
Will I set off the security monitors at the airport? Do I need a doctor’s letter?

You will probably set off the alarm as you progress through the security checkpoint. Be proactive and inform the security personnel that you have had a knee replacement and will most likely set off the alarm. Wear clothing that will allow you to show them your knee incision without difficulty. We do provide patients with a credit card that identifies them as having knee replacement; however, patients will usually be screened by security as well.

  • Do I need antibiotics before having dental work or any other invasive medical procedure?
Do I need antibiotics before having dental work or any other invasive medical procedure?

Yes. This is in order to limit the possibility of an infection occurring in the knee due to bacteria in our mouths getting into the bloodstream and traveling to the knee joint. Typically patients take 2 grams of amoxicillin or cefazolin 1 hour prior to dental work. Patients with a penicillin allergy often take clindamycin 600mg 1 hour prior to dental work. You will be given a card that describes this in the mail. Avoid any dental cleaning and other non-urgent procedures for approximately 3 months following knee replacement surgery.

  • Can I kneel?
Can I kneel?

After several months you may try to kneel. It may be painful at first, but will not harm or damage your knee replacement. Much of the discomfort comes from healing on your recent incision and the healing local tissues. Kneeling generally becomes more comfortable as time passes. Always use a pad under your knee.

  • Can I return to downhill skiing?
Can I return to downhill skiing?

Downhill skiing poses a risk. If patients have a significant prior skiing experience prior to their knee surgery, they may resume downhill skiing between 6 to 12 months following surgery. For who have not had experience with downhill skiing, it is inadvisable for patients to begin skiing. The risk from skiing comes not from the act of skiing itself, but rather from potential injury due to a serious fall or collision with another skier. Avoid skiing black diamond slopes and moguls. If you ski, be aware of the risks and ski only under good conditions.

  • When do I need to follow-up with my surgeon?
When do I need to follow-up with my surgeon?

Follow-up appointments are usually made postoperatively at 4-6 weeks after surgery followed by yearly and then every other year visits. These appointments are necessary to monitor the fixation of the prosthesis and evaluate the potential wearing out of the plastic articulation.

  • My knee makes an intermittent clicking or bumping noise. Is this normal?
My knee makes an intermittent clicking or bumping noise. Is this normal?

Yes. This is normal as the metal articulation is contacting the plastic. This is not a harmful situation and the majority of patients do experience this.

  • Why does the skin around my knee feel numb?
Why does the skin around my knee feel numb?

This is a normal and expected finding. The sensory nerves are interrupted with the knee incision resulting in an area of numbness around the knee, especially on the lateral aspect of the incision. Often, this improves over the course of one year, but may always feel somewhat different.

  • What should I be worried about?
What should I be worried about?

There are issues that are abnormal and require a call to the physician. These include:

  • Increasing redness about the wound.
  • Increasing pain and swelling, though it is normal to have increasing swelling following activity. It is also normal for the operated knee to feel warmer than the un-operated knee.
  • A temperature of more than 101.0 as well as drainage from the incision should prompt a call to the physician.
  • Leg or foot pain and swelling that does not resolve with overnight elevation and use of compression stockings as well as bleeding gums or blood in ones stool or urine should prompt a call to the physician’s office.

Joint Replacement FAQs Before Surgery 

This section deals with frequently asked questions for joint replacement with special focus on before surgery. You should be able to find an answer to your question here.


  • Do I need to attend the preoperative total joint education class prior to my surgery?
Do I need to attend the preoperative total joint education class prior to my surgery?

Being prepared for surgery and knowing what to expect are important components in your approach to a successful surgery and recovery. You and your family member(s) are highly encouraged to attend one of these classes to help you better understand the specialized equipment used, nursing care following your procedure, the rehabilitation process, nutrition, pain control, and discharge disposition options. This is also a great to opportunity to ask questions you may have.

  • Should I start or stop any medications prior to surgery?
Should I start or stop any medications prior to surgery?

Speak with your surgeon regarding which over-the-counter drugs, prescription medications, vitamins and herbal supplements you should stop taking before surgery.  Ask if you should take your heart and blood pressure medications with a sip of water on the day of surgery.

  • Should I have “prehab” therapy prior to surgery?
Should I have “prehab” therapy prior to surgery?

By strengthening your body prior to surgery, you will be better prepared and will return to your prior level of function more quickly. Collaborate with your surgeon and possibly a physical therapist to find the right exercises for you. Complete our Therapy Assessment Form for if you are interested in being contacted by someone from our physical, occupational or speech therapy team.

  • Will I need help at home?
Will I need help at home?

You will need to arrange to have someone with you for at least the first week after arriving home following joint replacement surgery. Living alone is not a requirement for going to a rehabilitation facility after surgery, and you may not be accepted or get approval from your insurance provider. Moreover, research shows that patients tend to do better if they can return to their familiar home environment, and we encourage this as first choice if they are safe.

  • What steps are taken to prevent infections?
What steps are taken to prevent infections?

Joint infection is a possible complication that we make every effort to prevent.  We instruct patients on pre-surgical scrubs at home for the night before surgery and the morning of as well as go over steps that patients can take at home to prevent infections, such as clean sheets on the bed and not sleeping with pets in the bed.  Patients also perform a surgical scrub once they come into the hospital on the morning of surgery and will continue this scrub daily while in the hospital.  This scrub works to eradicate the most common organisms to cause surgical site infections.  For more information on the many other ways we work together to prevent infections, read Avoiding Infections.


Joint Replacement FAQs on Hospitalization  

Get all your queries resolved with regards to joint replacement surgery and hospitalization.

  • Will I be in pain after surgery?
Will I be in pain after surgery?

You will have some discomfort after surgery, but we use a multimodal pain approach to keep you comfortable.  This includes nerve blocks performed by our anesthesia team, preoperative, intra-operative and postoperative medications to alleviate pain and swelling, ice, relaxation, as well as other approaches. Our patient-centered orthopedic care team is experienced in pain management and strives to make your recovery as comfortable as possible.

  • How long does the surgery last?
How long does the surgery last?

A total joint replacement surgery usually requires 1-2 hours to perform. Speak with your surgeon for specifics of the care plan that has been developed specifically for you.

  • How long will I be in the hospital?
How long will I be in the hospital?

The typical hospital stay for a joint replacement is between 1-3 days. There are certain criteria that need to be met prior to discharge from the hospital.  These include being able to get on and off the bed by yourself, up and down from a chair by yourself, and walk a safe distance without having someone support you.  Once these criteria are met, you and your care team will decide the best time for discharge. The nurse will then review all of your instructions and medications prior to your leaving the hospital.

  • When does therapy start after having a total joint replacement?
When does therapy start after having a total joint replacement?

Your therapy will start a few hours after having surgery. We aim to get you back on your feet as soon as possible and we do this by having a therapist meet you on the day of surgery to do an evaluation and to get you out of bed and moving your new joint. Early mobilization is key to preventing complications and a successful recovery.

  • What if I have steps/stairs at home?
What if I have steps/stairs at home?

Our therapy team will work with you on stair climbing prior to your leaving the hospital.  They will make sure you know the proper way to navigate those steps and will ensure that you are comfortable doing so. We recommend limiting your use of stairs to one trip up and one trip down a day in the beginning.

  • Will I need any special medications after surgery?
Will I need any special medications after surgery?

An antibiotic will be given to you before and after your surgery to help prevent infection. You will also need pain medication, at least for a couple of weeks after surgery. While taking pain medication, it is good to take a stool softener due to the constipating effects of those pain medications. A blood thinner will also be prescribed after surgery to prevent a blood clot. Your care team will discuss with you the plan for the duration of the blood thinner determined by your personal medical history.


Joint Replacement FAQs on Recovery  

This section of FAQs gives you answer for many questions which may arise in the recovery stage of joint replacement surgery.

  • How long is the recovery time after a joint replacement?
How long is the recovery time after a joint replacement?

You will continue to recover six to eight weeks after your surgery.  You should balance periods of activity with periods of rest.  Do not try to overdo or push yourself to the point of pain or exhaustion

  • When will I need to follow up with my surgeon?
When will I need to follow up with my surgeon?

You will need to follow up with your surgeon as directed. This is usually between 1 and 3 weeks after surgery.

  • When can I drive?
When can I drive?

You may not drive until you are cleared by your surgeon.

  • When can I return to work?
When can I return to work?

Most patients wait at least six weeks before going back to work.  Some return earlier if they can do so safely.  Discuss your options with your surgeon.

  • Do I have any restrictions after having joint replacement?
Do I have any restrictions after having joint replacement?

Yes. High impact activities such as running, singles tennis and basketball are not recommended. Contact sports are also discouraged after having joint replacement. Your restrictions may vary depending on the type of surgery you have. Discuss your activity level with your surgeon.


Spine FAQs Before Surgery  

Do you have a question related to Spine Surgery? We have given answers of most questions in this section please check it carefully.

  • Should I start or stop any medications prior to surgery?
Should I start or stop any medications prior to surgery?

Speak with your surgeon regarding which over-the-counter drugs, prescription medications, vitamins and herbal supplements you should stop taking before surgery.  Ask if you should take your heart and blood pressure medications with a sip of water on the day of surgery.

  • Should I have “prehab” therapy prior to surgery?
Should I have “prehab” therapy prior to surgery?

By strengthening your body prior to surgery, you will be better prepared and will return to your prior level of function more quickly.  Collaborate with your surgeon and possibly a physical therapist to find the right exercises for you.  Complete our Therapy Assessment Form if you are interested in being contacted by someone from our physical, occupational or speech therapy team.

  • What steps are taken to prevent infections?
What steps are taken to prevent infections?

We instruct patients on pre-surgical scrubs at home on the night before surgery and the morning of surgery as well as go over steps that patients can take at home to prevent infections, such as clean sheets on the bed and not sleeping with your pets.


Spine Surgery FAQs Hospitalization  

Get to know everything about spine surgery and hospitalization in this section.

  • Will I be in pain after surgery?
Will I be in pain after surgery?

You will have some discomfort after surgery, but we use a multimodal pain approach to keep you comfortable. Our patient-centered orthopedic care team is experienced in pain management and strives to make your recovery as comfortable as possible.

  • Who helps to arrange my care after I leave the hospital?
Who helps to arrange my care after I leave the hospital?

We have a case manager who will work with you, your care team, and your insurance company to determine what will be the best setting for your recovery, and they will help to arrange this as well as any other necessary items for you to take home.


Spine Surgery FAQs on Recovery

Everything about Spine Surgery recovery phase questions will be answered here. So try finding answer for your question as well.

  • When will I need to follow up with my surgeon?
When will I need to follow up with my surgeon?

You will need to follow up with your surgeon as directed.  This is usually between 1 and 4 weeks after surgery

  • When can I drive?
When can I drive?

You may not drive until you are cleared by your surgeon.


Opp. Government Polytechnic,
L-Colony, Near Panjarapole Cross Road,
Ambawadi, Ahmedabad – 380006
Gujarat

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